Publishing Trendsetter is a production of Market Partners International and Publishing Trends.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 1/26-1/30

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Oyster added all 10 Harry Potter universe books to its subscription service.

Author David Lagercrantz will write a sequel to Stieg Larsson’s Millennium Trilogy.

Simon & Schuster launched its new nonfiction imprint North Star Way, which will offer additional audience-building services to its authors.

UK grocery retailer Tesco ended its ebook initiative Blinkbox Books and transferred its customers to Kobo.

Wiley has teamed up with BitLit for ebook bundling.

Internview: “Before” with Moè Nakayama

We’re thrilled to welcome Moè Nakayama as this season’s Publishing Trendsetter and Market Partners International intern. In continuing our tradition of interviewing our intern in the first couple of weeks of the internship, we hope to provide some insight from an upcoming book professional on what they would like to learn to aid their future success in the publishing industry. Read more about Moè on the About page, and keep an eye out for her contributions over the next few months.

Trendsetter: What aspects of Publishing Trends and MPI interest you most as you enter the internship?

Moè: MPI combines the expertise of seasoned veterans with the dynamism of young professionals in the industry. As someone who’s just getting started in publishing, I’d love to learn from both and from the conversation happening between them.

So much of the material on Publishing Trends and Publishing Trendsetter are new and helpful to me. In particular, I really appreciate the weekly Top 5 News Articles feature— it’s given me some new vocab already, as well as a few bookmarks!

T: What “skill-sets” or areas of your knowledge would you most like to broaden with this internship?

M: This internship promises to provide a “macro” view of the business, and that’s exactly what I’d like to gain in my time here. My experience in publishing so far has been limited to editorial, so I feel like I need a better understanding of how publishing as a whole operates— as a process, as a business, as an industry… One example of something I’d like to learn more about is digital publishing. I think knowing about— if not the answers to, then the vocabulary for discussing— these issues will be important as I go on to (hopefully) contribute to the world of publishing.

I also want to expand on my writing skills. Since graduating college, I’ve become increasingly aware of how different non-academic writing is from academic writing. I’d like to train in writing concisely for a general audience— writing that informs as well as intrigues.

T: What kind of value do you think might be unique to a non-traditional book-business internship?

M: Breadth of insight. That’s not to say an internship at a publisher or an agency can’t provide a broad experience— not at all! But if you’re in editorial, for example, any insight you get into sales or production will most likely be indirect. A non-traditional book-business internship like this one allows you to open up your focus to the “bigger picture” and to get to know a variety of players and practices in the industry from a neutral standpoint. It’ll give me an awareness of the whole landscape— and that could help me figure out where my niche could be in publishing.

T: What makes you so drawn to publishing as a field?

M: Well, like most people interested in publishing, I’ve always loved reading, writing, books, and words. So that’s the obvious answer… But I guess the more interesting and honest answer is that, to me, publishing feels like a very inclusive industry. You’re not tied to one topic of expertise; you can keep learning about new ideas. I find that “roominess” comforting and exciting.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 1/19-1/23

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

With no buyer lined up, Egmont USA is closing at the end of this month.

Retail CEO of Barnes & Noble, Mitchell Klipper, will retire at the beginning of May of this year.

This week, Amazon announced their plans for textbook writers to be able to self-publish on the Kindle platform.

Kobo received a court order from the Canadian Competition Bureau to turn over their ebook pricing practices.

James Patterson is releasing a self-destructing ebook, as well as one physical book that will explode after reading, which will sell for close to $300,000.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 1/12-1/16

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Macmillan reached an agreement with Scribd and Oyster, becoming the third of the Big 5 to do so.

Simon & Schuster is now selling online courses by popular self-help, health, and finance authors.

Macmillan Science and Education will merge with Springer Science + Business Media with Macmillan owning the majority.

The Man Book Prize revised its longlist eligibility rules for 2015 submissions.

HarperCollins ebooks will now be available in the EPUB3 file format, but files will still be compatible with the EPUB2 format.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 1/5-1/9

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Scribd announced this week that they’ve raised $22 million toward their ebook subscription service.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg started a book club, causing sales to skyrocket for his first selection.

Recorded Books has officially acquired Tantor Media.

Google’s ebook program continues to grow steadily as it begins its fifth year.

The Author’s Guild’s case against HathiTrust was officially dismissed this week.

Listen Up! The Audiobook Revolution

Editor’s note: This was originally posted on our parent site, Publishing Trends.

With audiobook sales numbers on the rise over the past two years, retailers have been searching for new ways to appeal to wider audiences. So far, the most common trends have been straight-to-audio publications, library digital downloads, abridged audiobooks, and an increase in subscription services.  However, speculation has begun to spread as to whether publishers should repackage audiobooks to be more similar to podcasts, given the format’s latest successes.

At the end of November, Audible published The Starling Project by thriller writer Jeffery Deaver.  This publication differs from other audiobooks in one major way: it has never appeared in print.  In The New York Times, Alexandra Alter wrote that the book will “test the appetite for an emerging art form that blends the immersive charm of old-time radio drama with digital technology” and points out that this initiative shows that audiobooks are “coming into their own as a creative medium” in the publishing industry.

Deaver, who has no plans to authorize publication in print or digitally, is the most recognizable name in Audible’s content creating program, which has produced 30 other audio-exclusive original works.

Audible is not alone.  According to the same New York Times article, audiobook producer GraphicAudio is planning on releasing two of its own original series in 2015.

These new audio-first programs aren’t surprising given the surge of popularity for audiobooks in the last two years.  According to The Digital Reader, the American Association of Publishers (AAP) released a new report in October that stated downloadable audiobooks are the fastest growing format with a +26.2% growth in 2013.  In 2014, the AAP reported that sales were up 28%.  Meanwhile, ebooks are the second fastest growing with +7.5% growth in 2013 and 6% in 2014.

Read More »

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 12/29-1/2

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Kindle Unlimited authors are upset with Amazon for selling their books at low prices, affecting royalties.

The Senate Intelligence Committee Report on Torture sold out in stores after Melville House’s  quick transformation of the report into a book.

Wattpad users can now design their own book covers in its new Covers app.

Amazon ended the year with an increase in Kindle sales and Prime subscriptions.

HarperCollins had to remove Collins Middle East Atlas from stores because it didn’t include Israel.

 

Top 5 Publishing 2014 Reflections and 2015 Predictions

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. As we near the end of the year, we thought we would change things up and instead post 5 links to articles with predictions for the publishing industry in 2015.

Digiday outlined what we learned about publishing this year, focusing primarily on web and magazine publishing.

Publishers Weekly offers some ways we might improve diversity in book publishing like watching other industries and collaborating.

Publishing Perspectives asked publishing executives to contemplate the future of book pricing internationally while taking countries’ varying book cultures into consideration.

Harvard Magazine discussed some of the problems in academic publishing today and some possible solutions that should be explored.

Future of Publishing Founder Thad McIlroy compiled the Top 11 Trends and Opportunities for Digital Publishers in 2015 for the upcoming DBW 2015 conference. The complete compilation is only available for download from Digital Book World by submitting an email address.

Editor’s note: This post was originally posted on our parent site, Publishing Trends.

Second Annual The Best of the End of the Year “Best of” Lists of 2014

As soon as December 1st rolls around, “best of the year” lists start flooding the internet. And just like you, our favorite best of lists are the ones about books, bookstores, next year’s books, book trends, and well, anything about books and reading. For the second year in a row, we’ve compiled what we think are the best best of lists for 2014. You’ll recognize a few of the best of series from last year’s post, but they’re new for this year. Kick back, relax, and prepare yourself for the best bookish lists of the year.

Trendsetter Word Cloud 2014

Best and most used words on Publishing Trendsetter

Best list to help you visually shop for the year’s best books.

Best list to show you just how tough of a customer we can all be.

Best list to prove that 2014 was the year of strong starts.

Best list to prove that sometimes it’s just fine to judge a book by its cover.

Best list to show the biggest trends in fiction this year.

Best list to demonstrate that some of the most fun publishing projects don’t come about traditionally.

Best list that gives independent and poetry publishers some love.

Best interactive list to show that even picking out your next book can be an adventure.

Best standard “best of” list.

Best list to show you what books you may have missed this year, but shouldn’t have.

Best list of comics you should know about.

Best list to give you a clue of what’s being read in The White House.

Still the best list to see what some of the year’s most buzzed about readers and thinkers read.

Best compilation of all of the best ofs.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 12/15-12/19

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Macmillan and Amazon have made a multi-year deal.

Apple is back in court for the ebook price collusion case with an appeal, but this time things seems to be going well for them.

Google is considering adding a buy button and two day shipping to compete with Amazon Prime and one click ordering service.

A tablet made just for children, named Fable, will be available in March 2015.

A German app called Blinkist, which condenses nonfiction books into 15 minute summaries, has launched an audio version.