Publishing Trendsetter is a production of Market Partners International and Publishing Trends.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 4/14-4/18

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Barnes & Noble Founder and Chairman of the Board, Len Riggio sells off 3.7 million shares of stock.

Amazon announces it will retire Kindle Cloud Storage, moving users’ files to Amazon Cloud Drive.

Verso uses innovative discounting strategies to drive a successful launch of their new direct-to-consumer ecommerce service.

Following the merger with Penguin, 18 roles at Random House Children’s Publishers UK are at risk.

Lee Boudreaux leaves HarperCollins’ Ecco imprint and starts her own imprint at Little, Brown.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 4/7-4/11

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

With the growing popularity of long-form content, WordPress acquires Longreads.

Following a significant expansion of its user base, Wattpad raised an additional $46 million in venture funding.

Penguin Random House launches My Independent Bookshop, a book recommendation website that shares profits with independent bookstores.

A German Group, Pedia Press, launched an Indiegogo campaign to create a printed version Wikipedia.

Amazon Publishing International continues to grow and will publish 500 titles this year.

Let’s Get Digital: Notes from Digital Minds 2014

This article was originally published on our parent site for the book publishing industry, Publishing Trends

728x90-banner-ad

****

By Lorraine Shanley

Digital Minds, the conference that kicks off the London Book Fair, took place at the QEII Centre on April 7 with a large audience on hand and some lively speakers to inform and entertain them.  Authors Anthony Horowitz and Richard Wiseman talked about their respective approach to writing, publishing, and their audience, with the latter touting his YouTube successes.

A marketing panel brought together several publishers, including Penguin‘s Charlotte Richards and Open Road‘s Rachel Chou, who shared useful insights into strategies and analytics. Chou talked about analyzing  consumers’ clickpaths and providing follow-ups to both authors and retailers on what works.  Richards also mentioned feedback, both to authors as well as employees, on trends, successes, and data. Her clever presentation used classic Penguin cover art to illustrate her points.

The children’s panel focused more on how children interact with digital, rather than what content they ingest.  Storythings’ Matt Locke talked of how teens’ behavior has not changed as much in the social context, which jeopardizes their privacy.  Echoing Locke, BBC‘s Joe Godwin talked about how mobile devices are to children today what cars were to earlier generations–they provide a sense of control and autonomy. Read More »

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 3/31-4/4

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Liberty Media, a key investor in Barnes & Noble, sells off a majority of its stock in the company

Amazon Web Services has secured what is likely its most lucrative client, the Department of Defense.

Meanwhile, Amazon announces Fire TV, a competitor to Roku.

Audiobook sales have risen over the past five years, and industry analysts expect this trend to continue.

Ebook sales grew at a slower rate this year than last.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 3/24-3/28

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Amazon remains the number one seller of ebooks, but Apple and Barnes and Noble are in a tight race for second place.

New York Public Library is working with Zola Books to offer a new system for book recommendations.

Hachette’s UK counterpart, Hodder & Stoughton is set to purchase Quercus.

Following the ebook price fixing case, both Amazon and Barnes & Noble have issued credits to customers

Scribd expands into travel books by offering the full selection of Lonely Planet travel guides.

Bonus video: Students in Poland broke the World Record for World’s Longest Book Domino chain.

Book Jobs Not by the Book: Amanda Bullock, Director of Public Programming at Housing Works Bookstore and Cafe

Amanda BullockAmanda Bullock is the Director of Public Programming at Housing Works Bookstore Cafe in downtown New York City, where she organizes over 200 literary events a year and manages all of the bookstore’s social media. She is the co-creator and co-organizer of the Moby-Dick Marathon NYC (returning in November 2014) and the co-organizer of the Downtown Literary Festival.

 

*****
What was your first exposure to book business and what were the most important things you gained from it?

I moved to New York City in 2006 with a dream of working in book publishing and landed a job as a publishing assistant at Random House, working in the “information and value publishing” group. I started in September, and in December the group was being shut down and I was told my “position is being eliminated.” Yay publishing! But I was lucky: my boss at the time was looking out for me and I had (confusedly, at the time, as I had just started in my position) interviewed with another group at Random House, in audiobook publishing, where I was hired as a production associate. I worked in production for about five years, mostly at Fodor’s travel, before making the decision to leave corporate publishing.

I loved working at Random House. I came in at a very strange time, as the recession hit NYC shortly after I entered the business and a lot of things changed very quickly. It was a harrowing, fraught time when everyone was sort of in constant fear of being laid off. But maybe publishing is always like that. Anyway, I met some amazing people at Random House, many of whom I am still friends and collaborators with, including some other assistants from that first job taking calls from people who wanted to change words in the dictionary (seriously).

The major thing I learned in the corporate trenches was that even if you are bored day-to-day in your cubicle, spending way too much time googling random grad school panic-dreams, that just being in the book business can create wonderful connections—both social and professional—that you’ll find popping up throughout the rest of your career. Through some folks I met on the Random House softball team (Go Papercutz!), I got involved with the literary magazine Slice and their CoverSpy project, which ended up leading to my current job at Housing Works. So, after babbling for two paragraphs, what I learned was: the people involved and their passion are what make the book business great.

How do you explain your current job to people?
I plan parties for book nerds and babble about them on the Internet.

I’ve been with Housing Works Bookstore Cafe since August 2011. I book, organize, and run all of the public events at the bookstore (about 200 a year, from book clubs to a literary festival). I also manage the bookstore’s robust social media presence, with the help of an intern through an internship program I implemented. I wear a lot of smaller hats as part of those roles: I act as the public face of the bookstore, handle all of our marketing and publicity, and during events serve as the sound engineer, photographer, and more. It’s a lot of work, but it’s often really, really fun and sometimes I still can’t believe I get to do this job. Read More »

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 3/17-3/21

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Penguin Random House acquires Santillana and extends its reach into Spain, Portugal, and Brazil.

A New York Court ruled in HarperCollins’ favor in a copyright infringement case regarding the digital rights of Julie of the Wolves against Open Road Digital Media.

Will Nook’s self-publishing platform for UK authors help drive profits?

Author Kevin Trudeau has been sentenced to 10 years in prison for making outlandish claims in the infomercials for his diet book.

With the big screen adaptation on the way, the Divergent series takes the top three spots on this week’s ebook bestseller list.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 3/10-3/14

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Quercus is for sale, and Amazon is rumored to be interested in purchasing the independent publisher.

Google is being taken to court by a group of parents outraged over app purchases made by their children.

Amtrak is now accepting applications for their new writers residency program.

The third annual Twitter Fiction Festival started this week and goes through Sunday, featuring writers like R. L. Stine and Jim Gaffigan.

Nook and Microsoft updated their agreement, including a provision allowing them to co-brand content through an app called “Microsoft Consumer Reader.”

Book Jobs Not by the Book: Halimah Marcus, Co-editor of Electric Literature


Larissa & Sam Wedding
Halimah Marcus is the Co-Editor of Electric Literature, a digital publisher based out of Brooklyn, New York, and its weekly fiction magazine, Recommended ReadingIn addition to her editorial work, Halimah is also an author. Her writing has appeared in One StoryPhiladelphia NoirSports Illustrated, and elsewhere. She has a Masters in Fine Art in Fiction from Brooklyn College.

*****

What was your first exposure to book business and what were the most important things you gained from it?

My first “job” in publishing was interning at Electric Literature, where I am now editor, though I suppose my entree into the world of books was back when I worked at the Free Library of Philadelphia, coordinating fundraising dinners as part of the library’s author series. But then I was cordoned off in an office while authors and donors dined in the rare books department. Now I’m grateful to be able to actually interact with writers, rather than just imagining the glamorous things they must be saying down the hall.

How do you explain your current job to people?

I’m co-editor of Electric Literature, and indie publisher based in Brooklyn, and co-founder of our weekly digital magazine, Recommended Reading. Since 2009, our goal has to amplify the power of storytelling with digital innovation. We were the first literary magazine to publish simultaneously to all platforms (print and digital), the first with an iPhone app, the first to launch a YouTube channel, the first to serialized fiction on twitter, and now, with Recommended Reading, the first to use Tumblr as a publishing platform. My favorite aspect of my job is working directly with writers, but because we’re such a small organization, being an editor also means being the accountant, customer support, fundraiser, and developer. When my friends ask me questions like, can’t “they” give you the day off, I say, There is no they! It’s is only us! Read More »

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 3/3-3/7

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

After four years of coverage, The New York Times‘ Julie Bosman is leaving the publishing beat.

Ingram announced that it acquired CourseSmart, a digital course materials provider and previous competitor.

No need to feel left out from all of the AWP coverage, The New Yorker shares one attendee’s travel diary.

Amazon workers in the United Kingdom sent in a petition with 55,000+ signatures demanding better working conditions.

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt reports increased sales in 2013, despite an increase in their net losses.