Publishing Trendsetter is a production of Market Partners International and Publishing Trends.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 7/17-7/21

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

There will be two new Harry Potter books released in the fall. 

Keanu Reeves co-founded X Artists’ Books, an art book publisher. 

Amazon rolled out a social network, Spark, which encourages users to shop.

Barbour Publishing is now employee-owned

In an open letter to the World Wide Web Consortium, the International Federation of Library Associations stated that DRM is bad for the internet.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 7/10-7/14

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Denis Johnson will posthumously receive the Prize for American Fiction.

Milo Yiannopoulos has lashed out at reports of low sales.

Pearson sold $1 billion of its stake in Penguin Random House.

Barnes & Noble named Carl Hauch its new Vice President of Stores.

Dana Canedy will be the first woman and first person of color to serve as administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 7/3-7/7

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Warner Brothers and the Tolkien estate settled a lawsuit over licensing. 

The Curtis Brown literary agency bought Ed Victor Ltd

Overdrive was rebranded as Overdrive Rakuten.

Christian Stores is launching an online shopping arm

A lost Maurice Sendak book will be published next year

Focus On: Feminist, LGBT, and Black-Owned Bookstores

In the months since the election, a number of bookstores have taken up the activist banner – but they’re far from the first to do so. In fact, booksellers have been doing social justice work for a long time. The 20th century in America saw a boom in stores dedicated to fulfilling and celebrating long-marginalized populations, and the work continues today. So we’ve put together a brief overview of feminist, LGBT, and black-owned bookstores to help you dive into the world of activist bookselling. As the slogan goes, the personal is political – and what’s more personal than a book?

First things first: these communities frequently overlap. For example, a black-owned bookstore might stock feminist writers like Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, bell hooks, and Kimberlé Crenshaw, just as an LGBT bookstore might stock James Baldwin, and a feminist bookstore Octavia Butler.

That said, each community has its own history with literary engagement.  African Americans were denied access to education for generations, making the act of reading itself political. Depicting LGBT lives in art or literature pre-Stonewall usually ran artists and writers directly into one of several morality laws. And when second-wave feminists began doing intense work in the 1960s to organize a nascent movement around their own rights and freedoms, they did a great deal of it through the writing and reading of books and pamphlets.

Activist work wasn’t invented in the 60s and 70s, but that era’s political climate was heavily, and uniquely, influenced by the civil rights movement, the Stonewall Inn riots, and the second wave of feminism. This, plus the opening of a conversation about whiteness and maleness in publishing (a conversation we’re still having today), led to a vast number of new bookstore openings. Marcus Books, the oldest still-operating African American-themed bookstore in the country, has served the Oakland, CA area since 1960. Giovanni’s Room, America’s first gay bookstore, opened in Philadelphia in 1973. And Amazon Bookstore Cooperative (not to be confused with the online superpower!) served Minneapolis from 1970 to 2012 as the first lesbian/feminist bookstore in the United States. Read More »

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 6/26-6/30

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

After much criticism, the TSA has abandoned a book-screening pilot program.

Indie publisher Two Dollar Radio is opening a bookstore in Columbus.

Penguin Random House is closing Blue Rider Press, while Crown Publishing Group is launching Currency, a new nonfiction imprint.

Amazon Web Services will soon offer machine translation.

Kids in Fort Lauderdale are getting a book vending machine.

Romance as Resistance in 2017

It used to be I’d read one romance novel a year for my feminist book club. We started this  as a way to cleanse our palates after a particularly harrowing read, and then became a fun February tradition, a way to ease back into our monthly meetings after having a holiday break to read our January selection. This year, after our yearly romance read, I wanted more. I started buying discounted romance ebooks, checking them out from the library, and scouring Goodreads for suggestions on what else to read. I couldn’t really explain it other than reading them made me really happy. To friends, I’d say, “With all that’s going on this year, it’s just like basket of chocolate chip cookies to comfort me.” My best friend – and fellow book club member – was in the same boat. She couldn’t get enough romance either. But it wasn’t just any romances that we wanted to read, it had to be well, feminist romances. So when one of our absolute favorite feminist romance authors, Sarah MacLean, was having an event, we had to go.

Sarah MacLean’s launch party celebrating her newest title, The Day of the Duchess, was at McNally Jackson on June 26, 2017. There were cupcakes. There was wine. There was also a lot of political discussion. In short, this event wasn’t a typical launch party, there were no readings, but instead a lively conversation between authors, followed by audience Q&A and then a signing, all fortified by snacks and drinks. MacLean was joined for a discussion titled Reading Sex: The Power of Romance in 2017 with fellow romance authors Tessa Bailey and Zoraida Córdova and moderated by Eliza Thompson of Cosmopolitan.com.

Tessa Bailey, Sarah MacLean, Zoraida Córdova, and Eliza Thompson in conversation

Bailey, MacLean, Córdova, and Thompson.

Thompson started off the chat with a bang. Why, she asked, do people keep turning to romance after all these years? “I think there’s a lot of hope in romance, and sometimes when the world feels really hopeless you can read a book and go back to this moment where there’s a little bit of light at the end of that tunnel. Especially now, the last year and a half have pretty much been the worst years ever,” Córdova said.

MacLean agreed, but said that there’s another angle to romance that makes it so special and unique: “It’s really nice to see a genre that puts women at the center of the circle, and doesn’t put them there to suffer and die but puts them in the narrative to triumph and live…2017 has become that for me. We just have to triumph and live.” Read More »

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 6/19-6/23

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Many major publishers back Greenpeace in their standoff with a logging corporation.

Three textbook publishers have charged Follett with selling counterfeit textbooks. 

Despite potentially losing their funding, the NEA awarded millions of dollars in grants this week

HarperCollins will add over 15,000 ebooks to Hoopla, a digital library platform. 

Pottermore unveiled a Wizarding Book Club

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 6/12-6/16

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Tracy K. Smith is the new United States Poet Laureate.

Amazon is buying Whole Foods.

The 2017 Big Library Read began this week and will run until the 26th. 

The Lambda Literary Awards were announced on Monday.

David Grossman won the Man Booker International Prize on Wednesday.

Bonus: LeVar Burton will read to us once again on his new podcast.

How Did You Get Into Publishing? A Survey

It’s that time again. Every summer I get a flurry of emails from friends/family/fellow alumni, asking if I can offer their friend/niece/student advice on how to break into the publishing industry. I know I’m not alone in this – in fact, I’m imagining you nodding your head in agreement. You’d think at this point I’d just have a canned response of what to say to folks. And yet, every time I write out a different response depending on the person and their situation, not only because it’s the right thing to do, but because my advice changes the more time I spend in this industry and the more people’s stories I hear on how they got into the industry. 

Which got me thinking: I want to know how you got into publishing, and you, and you over there. It’s hard to break into a lot of industries, but publishing seems to be its own brand of tricky. So whether you started out in a totally different field, or you work at a small university press in the Midwest, whether you’re at a literary agency, a publisher, or a publishing-adjacent job (like me), or didn’t imagine yourself working in this industry at all I want to know how you got here. 

Please take this brief survey and encourage your publishing friends to do the same. I’ll report back on the results. 

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 6/5-6/9

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Overdrive unveils a new cost-per-circulation model for digital library assets.  

Penguin Random House acquired popular literary clothing store Out of Print.

The Kickstarter for The Well-Read Black Girl literary festival was successfully funded.

Bob Dylan gave his Nobel Peace Prize speech in the nick of time. 

Milo Yiannopoulous announced he will be self-publishing his controversial book.