Publishing Trendsetter is a production of Market Partners International and Publishing Trends.

Edelweiss, Edelweiss, Every Morning You Greet Me

While I titled this post with the Sound of Music song in mind, the purpose of it is to introduce you to a different Edelweiss than the song or the flower that inspired it. The Edelweiss we care about in the publishing world is a magical (read: free) online catalog that I only found out about a week ago, despite interning and working in publishing for the past two plus years. Shame on me.

According to the website, Edelweiss “allows reps, publicists, or other authorized persons in a publishing house to manage contact lists, create catalogs, share catalogs, and take requests.” These reps can also share DRCs and use the database for research or for networking with industry professionals.

Edelweiss was launched in 2008 by Above the Treeline and eight unnamed major publishers. Above the Treeline is a software company founded in 2001 by John Rubin specifically with the purpose of creating tools to provide sales and inventory analysis for independent bookstores and publishers.

Almost seven years later, 37,000 book industry professionals use Edelweiss to help their sales department sell to independent bookstores, according to their website.

Here’s how it works.

Read More »

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 9/22-9/26

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

New Jersey changed its state privacy laws to include browsed, purchased, and read ebooks.

Amazon is starting a new program to publish ebooks through crowdsourcing.

Amtrak announced the winners of its first Amtrak Residency Program, where writers will take a free long-distance round-trip to inspire new work.

Penguin Random House signed an exclusive deal with Universal Studios giving them first-look production of their titles for the next two years.

In London, the police took down their first ebook piracy website, OnRead.

NYC Bookternet IRL: Brooklyn Book Festival

On Sunday, my roommate Katie and I went to the 9th Annual Brooklyn Book Festival, which was our first book festival ever. We knew there was no way I’d be able to do everything on my to-do list, but also we knew I’d have to give it my best shot.

The numbers weren’t on our side, a fact that I blame largely on the deficiencies of time travel research. We had 8 hours – minus breaks for the bathroom, coffee, and food – to visit approximately 930 booths and attend almost 100 events at the 9 venues offered at Brooklyn Borough Hall and Brooklyn Plaza.

We knew going in that we’d have to pick and choose the events we cared about the most, since there were 10 going on at any given hour. Plus, we had to make time to visit as many booths as we could in addition to seeing authors.

It was hard to choose. The line-up was strong this year.  Some of the big name authors included Salman Rushdie, Joyce Carol Oates, Zadie Smith, Roxane Gay, James McBride, Phil Klay, Lev Grossman, Scott Westerfield, and Anne Brashares –just to name a few.

While in Booklyn (puns!), Katie and I wandered, which is probably the best part of the day.  Looking around, our initial thoughts were, “This is like the Scholastic Book Fairs of our childhood, but for adults!” and “How do we know where to go?”

Some of the day's goodies

Some of the day’s spoils.

The answer: just do what feels right. Read More »

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 9/15-9/19

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

At last, ebooks are becoming poetry friendly.

Barnes & Noble scrapped the ability to download Nook Books onto computers for ebook security reasons.

The National Book Award longlists were announced this week.

HarperCollins is adding a digital watermark to their ebooks to add yet another layer of security to their digital media.

A loophole was discovered in Audible’s payments system, which gives customers free audiobooks.

A Beginner’s Guide to Literary Events

It’s hard out there for a newcomer to the world of literary events, even when you’re in publishing. As a continuation to our Beginner’s Guides, we’re here to help you figure out how to spend your evenings and weekends at cool, bookish events. Fire up your keyboard for a follow fest on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, and/or email lists to stay in the know. (Unfortunately, this is list is pretty exclusive to New York City when it comes to specifics, but if you’ve got favorite literary hot spots that you want to share, we’d love for you to put them in the comments.)

Bookstores:

In the NYC area, we are blessed with many bookstores that put on great events, to name a few Housing Works Bookstore Café, The Strand, and Barnes & Noble Union Square (that’s not even getting to Brooklyn). From card making classes, to parties, to readings and conversation between excellent writers and creatives, bookstores will keep your calendar full. McNally Jackson‘s got a reading going on this Friday, if you don’t have plans:

Follow the houses (and imprints):

Of course, every single publisher has a social media presence, not to mention their respective imprints. By now, you’ve probably figured out which imprints you admire, which small presses publish the crime stories you love, and so on. By following the ones you like, or just all of them, you’ll get all kinds of news. They’ll promote their new titles, tell you about sweet ebook deals,  and also let you know when they’re throwing parties or hosting events. You know, parties like this:

Read More »

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 9/1-9/5

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Amazon launched a new service this week that will allow authors to upload children’s books onto the Kindle platform.

Barnes & Noble is testing the use of Espresso Book Machines in three of their east coast stores.

Winner of the Man Booker Prize, Eleanor Catton, started a grant from her prize winnings that will allow writers to take the time to read.

The Future Book Project will be collecting one work each year from a prominent author and not releasing it until 2114.

USA Today announced at least 60 layoffs, including book reviewer Bob Minzesheimer.

A Beginner’s Guide to Industry Newsletters

When you’re trying to break into publishing or first starting out, there’s a lot to learn and a lot of places to learn it from.  Below is a list of  industry newsletters that we think are helpful to subscribe to and hope you do too.

1. Publishers LunchPublishers Lunch comes from the same people who bring us Publishers Marketplace.  The newsletters from this site will include the most recent deals posted on Marketplace, a job board, job moves, and “Today’s Lunch,” which is usually a good source of industry news gathered and written by its employees. It is published daily, “except when not,” according to its header.

2. PW Daily Publishers Weekly is a printed publishing news magazine.  If you’re too impatient to wait for a subscription to arrive in the mail (and let’s face it, we all are), subscribing to the daily newsletter will get you your updates quickly.  Some of its recurring newsletter sections include a job board, industry job moves, a roundup of articles from others, as well as links to its own articles.

3. Publishing Business Today – Sent out by Publishing Executive, this daily newsletter provides readers with book industry news and press release roundups.  The email also includes magazine publishing news, but happily for us, divides the two industries well so you don’t end up reading anything about magazines publishing unless you want to!

4. DBW DailyDigital Book World is a news site that sends out a daily newsletter with links to DBW’s new feature articles and hard news for the publishing world.  It’s a good source for hard news of what’s going on with technology in publishing. Personally, I have fun disagreeing with some of the opinion pieces.

5. YPG Newsletter – The Young to Publishing Group sends out a monthly newsletter about upcoming group events in the NYC area.  YPG is a solid way to meet new people who are also starting out in publishing.  Even if you don’t join or attend, the newsletters will let you know what young people in the industry are talking about.

6. GalleyCat –GalleyCat is a daily newsletter from the media news website Mediabistro.  It offers links and the first paragraph of articles from its own website as well as a job board made up of posts from the parent site.  Pro-tip: it advertises as “the first word on the book publishing industry,” but Publishers Lunch often wins that race.

7. Shelf Awareness – Shelf Awareness is a news site that sends daily newsletters.  When subscribing, be sure to choose the newsletter for book trade professionals instead of the one for readers. These newsletters have a few sections, but the most important to you are probably the news and job board ones.  It also provides more coverage on booksellers than any of the other letters.  One of the nice things about Shelf Awareness is that it posts the entire article in the newsletter, so no annoying click-bait or multiple tabs. However, Shelf Awareness is better for newcomers as its focus is more for readers.

8. Publishing Perspectives – The news site Publishing Perspectives sends a daily email that will give you a rundown of the news and opinions written by their own writers. It is a project by the Frankfurt Book Fair and aims to spread international publishing news.   The news is slower here, but the opinion pieces can be interesting to read.

9. USR Monthly – The US Review of Books publication will send you a monthly newsletter about which books its writers reviewed that month and which ones they recommend reading.  This is an easy source for new titles to add to your to-read list and can help you stay in-the-know about what books are making people talk.

10. Publishing Trends – Last, but certainly not least, is our very own host site.  Although aimed toward higher-level publishing professionals, Publishing Trends is another good source for news and trends updates.  Subscriptions will get you an email alert whenever there’s a new post.  Our recurring posts include weekly 5 links posts full of opinion pieces and data (unlike the news-oriented 5 links posts you find here on Trendsetter), a monthly international bestsellers article, and a bi-monthly people round-up.  It will also have the occasional feature article of an industry insight of a trend.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 8/25-8/29

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

University of Colorado Boulder researchers are using 3-D technology to recreate classic children’s books for the visually impaired.

Libraries in and around Ferguson, MO remained open during protesting, offering themselves as “a quiet oasis” for all ages.

The cry for diversity in children’s books has spread from the US to the UK.

Capstone Publishing Group acquired Engage Literacy, a K-3 literacy program.

Used eBook sales continue to be blocked in Germany, as consumer rights group loses its appeal.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 8/18-8/22

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

A judge in Delaware passed a law making digital content, including ebooks, inheritable after the original owner dies.

Romance publisher Ellora’s Cave announced cuts to their staff, due in part to a decrease in their Amazon sales.

Kensington Publishing joined up with Books-A-Million to put some of Kensington’s previously digital-only offerings into print.

Several German, Austrian, and Swiss authors took a stand against Amazon’s treatment toward books published by the  Bonnier Group.

Despite the cancellation of the Hachette/Perseus/Ingram deal, Perseus will retain Legato as an affiliate.