Publishing Trendsetter is a production of Market Partners International and Publishing Trends.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 7/23-7/27

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

The Man Booker Prize longlist includes a graphic novel for the very first time.

Mystery solved: Dartmouth professors say they’ve identified the Lorax.

An investment group bought a 5.68% stake in Barnes & Noble

Suspects were arrested in the theft of $8 million in rarities from the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh‘s rare book collection.

Forbes published, and quickly deleted, an inflammatory op-ed arguing for Amazon to replace public libraries.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 7/16-7/20

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Lin-Manuel Miranda and Jonny Sun are publishing a book of pep talks.

Audiobook distributor RBMedia was sold to a private equity firm.

Elsevier has blocked Germany and Sweden during a dispute over the cost of nationwide open access.

Electric Literature launched a new feature in response to the New York Times‘s “By the Book.”

Chance the Rapper announced his acquisition of Chicagoist via song.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 7/9-7/13

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Marvel legend Steve Ditko has died.

The original map of the Hundred-Acre Wood set an auction record.

Liu Xia, widow of dissident poet Liu Xiaobo, has been freed from house arrest.

The English Patient won the Golden Man Booker Prize.

Regnery is expanding and rebranding its faith imprint.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 7/2-7/6

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

On Tuesday, Barnes & Noble fired its CEO without severance pay.

Swedish luminaries will award an alternative Nobel Prize for literature this year.

The plagiarism suit against author Emma Cline has been dismissed.

In South Carolina, a high school summer reading list drew criticism from the local police.

Junot Díaz has denied the allegations against him, and his accusers have responded.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 6/25-6/29

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

A biography of the late Anthony Bourdain will be released in fall 2019.

This week saw the deaths of both Donald Hall and Harlan Ellison.

The ALA‘s Association for Library Service to Children voted to remove Laura Ingalls Wilder’s name from its award.

The Whiting Foundation awarded a combined $120,000 to A Public Space, Fence, and Words Without Borders.

For two weeks beginning July 30, Tor.com Publishing will be open for novella submissions.

Bonus: the Man Booker Prize turns 50 this year, and Lit Hub put together a by-the-numbers look at its first half-century.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 6/18-6/22

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Junot Díaz has been cleared to return to MIT.

The Oxford English Dictionary issued a call for regional vocabulary

Children’s lit authors are speaking out against the family separation policy.

States can now require retailers to collect sales tax.

Dropbox is getting into media and entertainment.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 6/11-6/15

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Stan Lee‘s business manager is being investigated for elder abuse.

Kitchen Confidential has become a bestseller after Anthony Bourdain‘s death.

After Lionel Shriver mocked a diversity drive at Penguin Random House UK, the literary world is responding.

Netflix and Penguin Random House are launching a series of books based on Stranger Things.

The director of the University of Georgia Press vowed to cancel the book contracts of sexual harassers

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 6/4-6/8

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

The 2018 Lambda Literary Award winners are here.

iBooks is getting a makeover for iOS 12. 

Three poetry editors at The Boston Review have resigned over the magazine’s continued relationship with Junot Díaz.

Baltimore’s Enoch Pratt Free Library plans to completely eliminate fines on overdue books.

Romance writers can continue to use the word “cocky” in their book titles.

Bonus: poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti is publishing his first novel at 99.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 5/28-6/1

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Donadio & Olson‘s accountant embezzled over $3.4 million.

Edwards Brothers Malloy is shutting down its printing business.

The Nobel Prize may not be awarded in 2019, either.

Netflix released a trailer for its first comic book.

Copper Canyon launched a fundraiser to publish Ursula K. Le Guin’s last book of poetry.

Diversity in Literature from the Standpoint of a Biracial Latina Woman

Growing up with a Dominican mother and an Ashkenazi father, I never saw books about myself. Because my father was never particularly religious and my sisters and I were raised Catholic, it was natural for me to feel more connected to my Dominican side. Even from my earliest memory, little four-year-old me knew who she was: she was Dominican. Every night she ate rice and beans and maduros and tried to understand what her abuela and mother were saying. But she also knew that she was biracial and was always proud of that.

In 8th grade English class, though, I had an epiphany. We were reading a collection of short stories (I forget what it was called) about immigration and culture in Latino families. I’ll be honest, I hated this book.  The story I remember most vividly was about a group of preteen girls who decided to wear heels despite their mothers’ warnings about the negative attention this would bring. The heels “allowed” them to be harassed by old men – and they enjoyed it, to the point where things got touchy and one of the old men offered them a dollar for a kiss. I believe one of the girls reciprocated, but after that they stopped wearing the heels. Because of this they magically stopped being harassed and all the old men ignored them again.

See, ridiculous and creepy. I think this story was the end of me dealing with that book. But reading this short story collection made me realize something instrumental. I had only found my culture in books specifically about my culture. Why were we only written about here, in these books? And why weren’t we found elsewhere?

I voiced my frustrations. For some reason I expected my classmates to agree, or if not, to acknowledge my point, but it turned out to be quite the opposite: I was scoffed at. It wasn’t a big deal and I was making something out of nothing. I was surprised and decided to push. It seemed so obvious to me, and I wasn’t someone who was about to back down. My classmates responded with irritation and eye rolls. So I went to talk to my teacher; maybe she’d listen to me. But while she wasn’t harsh, she was annoyed and told me something along the lines of that there was nothing there and I was making up this whole idea. Even my friends agreed.

It hurt: the only Latina in that class was being told her feelings were wrong. My voice about my culture didn’t have any weight. Seething, I decided to not bring it up again. And this rejection caused me to shove my feelings into the back of my mind.

My feelings didn’t disappear completely, you see, but I didn’t bring them up again. Instead, I rolled my eyes at certain titles because, yes, I had gained an animosity for cultural books. I wanted not only Latinos, but all minorities, to not be trapped in one genre; to be characters in any other type of books.

 What Counts as Representation?

Books about cultural identity, in which the plot is centered on the experience of being a POC, are extremely important, and we need more of them. But why should we stop there? Do culture and race have to be the focus of a plot to write about minority characters? Of course not.

We need way more stories about, let’s say, a CIA agent who just happens to be Latino, or stories starring POC working as monster slayers or struggling with first love in high school. Their culture is represented, but it’s not the entire plot of the book. Why can’t people of color be their own stars in a narrative of infinite possibilities? Anyone, including a white audience, can read these books, and POC (especially younger people who probably aren’t going to search for book about their culture identity) can find representation in genres they already love.

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