Publishing Trendsetter is a production of Market Partners International and Publishing Trends.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 4/9-4/13

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

New releases are coming from Malala Yousafzai’s father and J.R.R. Tolkien.

Skyhorse underwent a major reorganization this week. 

The ALA released its annual list of most-banned books.

Our Bodies, Ourselves will cease publication after fifty years.

The Nobel Prize committee for literature is facing a resignation crisis.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 4/2-4/6

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Author Anita Shreve and literary benefactor Drue Heinz died this week.

The 2018 Hugo Award nominees have been announced.

The CEO of Killer Nashville is launching Clay Stafford Books.

Garrison Keillor, fired for allegations of sexual misconduct, wants to bring The Writer’s Almanac back to the air.

The Man Booker International Prize will list authors by country, not by nationality, after a controversy over Taiwan.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 3/26-3/30

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Congress voted to bump up funding for the National Endowments for the Arts and Humanities.

The New York Times is reinstating graphic novel coverage – sort of.

Former Atria president and publisher Judith Curr is moving to HarperCollins

The 10th annual Dylan Thomas Prize shortlist is here.

John Oliver‘s Marlon Bundo book had a controversial rollout (though the book itself has a fan in Charlotte Pence).

Bonus: Electric Lit wants to help you pitch that novel. 

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 3/19-3/23

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

The 2018 Wellcome Book Prize shortlist is out, and it’s female-dominated. 

James Comey’s book is already a bestseller, and it might become a movie.

John Oliver announced a competing picture book about Mike Pence’s pet rabbit, which quickly sold out.

The American Indian Literature Associate (AILA) revoked Sherman Alexie’s 2008 award.

This year, James Patterson’s annual donation for classroom libraries will come to $2 million.

Bonus: A banned book is using Don Quixote and the internet to get around the Spanish courts.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 3/12-3/16

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

The longlist for the 2018 Man Booker International Prize is out.

Judges for the 2018 National Book Awards have been announced.

Physicist and author Stephen Hawking died this week

Following sexual harassment allegations, Sherman Alexie declined the Carnegie Medal.

New books are forthcoming from Malala Yousafzai, Pope Francis, and…Anthony Scaramucci

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 3/5-3/9

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

The #KidLitWomen project launched to address gender inequality in children’s publishing.

Poet and professor Lucie Brock-Broido passed away this week at 61. 

Barnes & Noble is launching a nationwide book club.

Several of Sherman Alexie‘s accusers have gone on the record.

Berkeley’s Revolution Books received threats of arson last weekend.

Book Jobs Not by the Book: Lena Valencia, Managing Editor at One Story

Lena Valencia is the managing editor of One Story. She has held positions at A Public Space and BOMB Magazine, and for three years hosted the HiFi Reading Series in Manhattan. Her writing has appeared in JoylandBOMBThe Masters Review, and elsewhere. She received her MFA in Fiction from The New School. You can find her on Twitter at @lenavee.

What was your first exposure to book business and what were the most important things you gained from it?

I worked at the independent bookstore Powerhouse Arena for four years, first as an events coordinator and then as a buyer. I was in my early 20s and my knowledge of publishing was basically this: writer writes book, writer publishes book, people buy book. It wasn’t until I was working at the bookstore and began working with sales reps and publicists and meeting editors and agents at book launches that I began to understand all the moving parts of the publishing process. Most importantly, I think, I learned that even if your book is buzzed-about and you have a rock star publicity team, people won’t necessarily buy it. Doing returns—sending books we didn’t sell back to the publisher’s warehouse—was one of the not-so-great parts of working in book retail. I’m a writer myself, so imagining how much work went into each of the titles I was boxing up because no one wanted them was upsetting.

That being said, I also was exposed to NYC’s wonderful, supportive literary community. There’s really nothing like the thrill of a packed bookstore for an author’s debut book.

How do you explain your current job to people?

I tell them I wear many hats, or, if I want to sound fancy, I say I work as a liaison between editorial and production, which makes it sound like we have dozens of people working on an issue of the magazine when it is really just a handful of dedicated, talented individuals. Basically, I’m responsible for the magazine’s layout and for sending the issues off to the printer. I also assign work from our slush pile to our volunteer readers, assist the publisher with grants, help out with our educational programming, manage the interns, and sometimes do social media.

In what ways did your previous jobs or internships prepare you for what you do here?

I’ve worked at two wonderful magazines—BOMB and A Public Space. I started working at BOMB as an intern when I was straight out of college. Part of my job as an intern was to read all the literary magazines that we had subscriptions to and flag the stories that I thought were interesting, so that the senior editor could solicit the authors. I think it was reading all those journals that really taught me what a literary magazine was. One story that I found—in A Public Space, actually—was called “Cattle Haul,” by a writer named Jesmyn Ward. It was her first publication. I flagged it and brought it to the attention of Mónica de la Torre, who was the senior editor at the time. BOMB ended up publishing a excerpt from her first book, Where the Line Bleeds. I was over the moon when she won her first National Book Award.

At A Public Space I learned some of the more practical aspects of working at a magazine: layout, typesetting, proofreading, etc. I also got to work closely with some amazing editors: Brigid Hughes and Jonathan Lee. That allowed me to see how a great editor can transform a story without leaving a trace.

What value has this job brought to the way you think about book business as a whole and your own relationship to books?

I knew a fair amount about the book industry coming in, but working at One Story has taught me about the persistence that’s required of writers who want to publish a book. Many OS authors have submitted to One Story several times over as many years before getting an acceptance from us (we publish each author only once). We keep in touch with our authors and celebrate their first published books at our annual Literary Debutante Ball—this can happen years after they publish a story with us. I think there’s an illusion that “success” comes quickly and effortlessly when really it takes time, work, and a lot of rejection to get a book into the world.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 2/26-3/2

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Following allegations of sexual misconduct, Sherman Alexie has released a statement.

Jill Soloway will lead Topple, a new Amazon imprint for LGBTQ books.

Michelle Obama’s memoir has a title and release date.

Children’s literature is joining the #MarchForOurLives movement.

In addition to Black Panther, Ta-Nehisi Coates will write for Captain America.

Bonus: Dolly Parton‘s Imagination Library just sent out its hundred millionth book.

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 2/19-2/23

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

Milo Yiannopoulos has dropped his suit against Simon & Schuster.

Publishing startup Serial Box landed a $16.5 million seed investment.

McGraw-Hill will offer a rental program for textbooks and ebooks.

Evangelist and author Billy Graham died this week at 99.

The state of Michigan wants money from Curtis Dawkins‘s book to go towards paying for his own imprisonment

Top 5 Publishing News Stories 2/12-2/16

number_5_orangeEvery week we recommend 5 publishing news stories that young book professionals should read to feel more connected to what’s going on in the industry. There are only 5, so even if you weren’t able to read a thing all week, these should help keep you in the know.

The 2018 Youth Media Awards were announced.

Trump’s new budget takes aim at the NEA and NEH – again.

Barnes & Noble issued company-wide layoffs.

Amazon announced plans for its own shipping service.

A number of children’s book authors have been accused of sexual harassment (and two have been dropped by their representation).