Publishing Trendsetter is a production of Market Partners International and Publishing Trends.

Book-Jobs Not By the Book: Writing Children’s Book Apps

Nosy Crow is one of the most established and respected children’s app development companies in the world. Kate of Nosy Crow did a great blog post yesterday on the new skills and vision required for making children’s book apps. She lays out some of the major differences between traditional authorship and writing for apps, and also goes a long way toward suggesting the skills you might nurture if you want to find a place in this new book business niche.

If you’re excited by brand-new corners of book business, this one certainly sounds full of opportunity, and and chances to be a pioneer and whatnot. Some things to think about if you want to try your hand at authoring book apps, according to Kate:

Creating an app is a highly collaborative process. More, perhaps, like writing a film-script than writing a book. Of course, picture book authors are used to being edited, but writing something truly interactive which accommodates other media does require a different level of flexibility and team-playing. Our apps are highly interactive and include illustration, animation, voice audio and music: the text is, just by virtue of the arthmetic a smaller part of that mix than it is in a picture book… which is not to say that it’s not a hugely important part of the mix.

Creating an app is a technical process. Moira writes about “teccies” and “computer whizzes”, and I think that authors who are interested in working into new media need to get to know “teccies” and “computer whizzes” and understand their kind of creativity, their sensitivities and what they regard as excellent in their fields. That’s not to say that authors need to come to publishers with a finished, coded app (we wouldn’t want that, for example: we have our own technical team, and we want to use code we’ve created), I do think that having some understanding of what does into animation and coding is helpful.

Creating an app is a new process. Authors who write picture books know their genre inside-out, and can draw on a huge experience of reading picture books themselves and, usually, of reading picture books to children. In August 2009 Winged Chariot launched Europe’s first picture book app (you can read about it here and elsewhere), so we’re looking at a genre that is just three years old. We began work on apps that we expected would be used on a screen bigger than the one we had available several months before the launch of the iPad, which turned out to be the name of the device we’d been expecting, in May 2010. So apps are new, and they’re developing fast. I think that authors who are interested in writing in this space need to keep up with developments, immerse themselves in this world and get to know the best of the apps that are out there, and, even better, spend time with children who are reading those apps to see how they use the screen and what they expect from it…

READ THE WHOLE POST HERE.

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